The Trials and Tribulations of a Failed Charity

October 16, 2012
By `

NY Times:

Wyclef Jean signed books at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan last month to promote his new memoir, “Purpose: An Immigrant’s Story.” In it, the Haitian-born hip-hop celebrity claims he endured a “crucifixion” after the Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake when he faced questions about his charity’s financial record and ability to handle what eventually amounted to $16 million in donations. Credit: Michael Appleton for The New York Times.

A mural at the entrance to the Jean et Marie orphanage pictures Mr. Jean and his wife surrounded by children. Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

At the Jean et Marie orphanage that Yele took under wing, boys watch TV in a wing that another charity rebuilt. Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

The leader of a tent camp outside Port-au-Prince, initially taken under wing by Yéle, said the camp had not seen any sign of the charity since the summer of 2010. Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

Village of Hope, which has 29 severely disabled children, who were being fed gruel for supper during a recent visit, said it had never received a single promised food basket from Yéle. Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

Yéle allotted $230,000 for the revitalization of this Port-au-Prince plaza in the Cité Soleil slum, with no lasting results. Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

The estate that served as Yéle’s headquarters the year after the earthquake, and on which it lavished $600,000, is now deserted. Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

At the Jean et Marie orphanage, Diaoly Estimé, the director, said she felt abandoned by Yéle, which built a dormitory wing that does not have enough beds for the children, a cafeteria that does not have food to cook and classrooms though there is no money to pay teachers. Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

The Rev. Occide Cico Jean runs a peasant farmers’ collective that was paid $600,000 to provide weekly deliveries of produce for a year to orphanages. The program was suspended by Yéle’s chief executive, who was skeptical of its cost and value. Credit: Richard Perry/The New York Times

Wyclef Jean at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan recently. Credit: Michael Appleton for The New York Times

3 Responses to “ The Trials and Tribulations of a Failed Charity ”

  1. jack peters on October 16, 2012 at

    “The Rev. Occide Cico Jean runs a peasant farmers’ collective that was paid $600,000 to provide weekly deliveries of produce for a year to orphanages. The program was suspended by Yéle’s chief executive, who was skeptical of its cost and value.”

    The only thing of value that Wyclef did and his people cancel it. Pere Cico is a legend in Haiti as head of the Af Neg Kombite, a collection of peasant organizations.

    Wyclef should roast in Hell… or have to live in Haiti.

  2. Marc Charles on October 16, 2012 at

    If he lives in Haiti, it should be in a jail cell with open windows so we can spit on him when we pass by

  3. Deloit on October 17, 2012 at

    “A mural at the entrance to the Jean et Marie orphanage pictures Mr. Jean and his wife surrounded by children. ”

    Bullshit. I see a mural showing Wyclef with a bunch of kids around him, and his Wife sitting off to the side- clearly removed from the situation, with nobody around her.

    This is the way it is in life with him- he is only seen with hookers and his mistresses, or some retarded looking bodyguard.