Haiti Arts Thrive Again Because Of Boost From Advocacy Groups (PHOTOS) -Added COMMENTARY By Haitian-Truth

December 20, 2012
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MAKING IT IN HAITI: Three years after a devastating earthquake, there’s still not much economic traction in this impoverished Caribbean country, but arts and crafts have taken off.

CRAFTING RECOVERY: The artisan industry is enjoying a boost from advocacy groups that organize workers and improve quality. Big retailers like Macy’s and Anthropologie and three high-end designers are among those working with at least five artisan groups to export arts and crafts.

ART START: The number of artisans has increased thanks in part to more than $3 million from groups like the Inter-American Development Bank and the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund.

In this Dec. 9, 2012 photo, an artists paints arts and crafts at the Ajoupas Shop in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. The artisan industry is enjoying an outright resurgence as it’s boosted by artisan advocacy groups that are helping organize workers and improve quality. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

In this Dec. 9, 2012 photo, a worker prepares a piece of metal art at the Jacques Rony's Arts and Crafts shop in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. The recovery of the craft industry had been slow until the 2010 earthquake thrust Haiti into the spotlight. Artisans now see their crafts competing on the international market and creating jobs in a country where steady employment has long been elusive. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

In this Dec. 8, 2012 photo, arts and crafts hang for sale in the Jacques Rony's shop in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. Haitian crafts reached their peak in the early 1980s when thousands were employed. But the industry, and the rest of Haiti’s economy, collapsed following a United Nations-imposed embargo in 1993 that sought to restore constitutional rule after a military junta ousted then-President Jean-Bertrand Aristide (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

In this Dec. 8, 2012 photo, an artist prepares a piece of art at Jacques Rony's Arts and Crafts shop in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. Haiti boasts of a tradition of master artistry. Before the 2010 earthquake, Haiti’s renowned artisans were beholden to the occasional tourist or Haitian emigrants who would cart a suitcase of baubles back home. But now the artisan industry is enjoying an outright resurgence. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

In this Dec. 8, 2012 photo, an artist draws a piece of a metal at the Arts and Crafts shop in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. At least three major U.S. retailers and three high-end designers are now working with at least five artisan groups to export Haitian arts and crafts. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

Eligene Viciere In this Dec. 11, 2012 photo, Eligene Viciere, 39, creates a wooden bowl at the Einstein wood shop in Carrefour, Haiti. The sector of arts and crafts has taken off as one of the few bright spots to emerge from an otherwise sluggish rebuilding effort following the 2010 earthquake. And with U.S. shoppers searching for the perfect gifts, demand in Haiti is high. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

Ivonne Paul In this Dec. 11, 2012 photo, Ivonne Paul, 68, prepares wooden bowls at the Einstein wood shop in Carrefour, Haiti. Before the 2010 earthquake, Haiti’s renowned artisans were beholden to the occasional tourist or Haitian emigrants who would cart a suitcase of baubles back home. But now the artisan industry is enjoying an outright resurgence as it’s boosted by artisan advocacy groups that are helping organize workers and improve quality. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

Marleine Land In this Dec. 11, 2012 photo, Marleine Land, 24, creates a decorative wooden bowl at the Einstein wood shop in Carrefour, Haiti. At least three major U.S. retailers and three high-end designers are now working with at least five artisan groups to export Haitian arts and crafts. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

In this Dec. 8, 2012 photo, an artists creates metal art at the Fritz Calixte's Arts and Crafts shop in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. The number of workers creating metal work crafts from recycled oil drums, home decor and bead jewelry has increased and workshops have opened throughout the Caribbean nation, thanks in part to an injection of money from outside groups such as the Inter-American Development Bank and the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund, a pro-business nonprofit set up by the former U.S. presidents. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

In this Dec. 9, 2012 photo, a worker prepares a piece of art at the Fritz Calixte's Arts and Crafts shop in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. Three years after a devastating earthquake rocked this impoverished country, there’s still not much economic traction, but one small niche is taking off: Arts and crafts. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

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COMMENT:HAITIAN-TRUTH.ORG
This sounds nice, and the artists need all the help they can get.However, it is not a one way street.

In fact, it is not a charity move for groups like MACY’s who will buy a piece of metalwork, from an artist in Croix des Bouquets for $5.00 and sell it for $64.00. It would seem to me that, if groups like MACY’s were really interested in advancing the lives of the artists, they could give them a little bit more of the pie.

Like the new assembly plants, sponsored by Bill Clinton, they are simply taking advantage of the Haitians’ desperate situation.

In the new Clinton slave camp the Haitian worker will make something like $0.69 per hour which is not enough for subsistence and school. The slave factories, (and I have always been one who would get irritated when the left-wingers mentioned “sweat shops”) but I must protest the Clinton concept being applied.

Profit margins would allow a higher payment for products and a higher wage for workers.

One Response to “ Haiti Arts Thrive Again Because Of Boost From Advocacy Groups (PHOTOS) -Added COMMENTARY By Haitian-Truth ”

  1. Bakken on December 29, 2012 at

    let’s eliminate the clinton slave camp and sell direct on the Net. call it the Haitian Marketplace. God bless