Basic sanitation is a human right, says SOIL founder

November 25, 2017
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Dr Kramer co-founded the Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL) group in Haiti in 2006.
The faeces are treated, and converted to compost, and used to return the nutrients from human waste to the soil.

The faeces are treated, and converted to compost, and used to return the nutrients from human waste to the soil.

Hyderabad: Dr Sasha Kramer, a delegate of the Global Entrepreneurship Summit (GES), says that it is good for sanitation to be considered within the realm of entrepreneurship.

Dr Kramer co-founded the Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL) group in Haiti in 2006. She says that the organisation sees human waste as a valuable resource. SOIL builds toilets that separate urine and faeces through the use of specially-designed toilet seats. The faeces are treated, and converted to compost, and used to return the nutrients from human waste to the soil.

“It is very difficult to explain something like toilets to people. We need to talk about the circular economic system, and the various aspects related to it. Sanitation brings together health and the environment.”

1,500 entrepreneurs like Dr Kramar will participate in the GES. “These types of summits help people meet sanitation practitioners who understand that basic sanitation is a human right,” she says.

At the summit, she hopes to connect with like-minded people.
“It is inspiring to see people from around the world. I am excited about this opportunity,” she says.

Dr Kramer, who has visited India several times in the past, says that she is impressed by the Swacch Bharat campaign. She says that she hopes the Government of Haiti will prioritise sanitation in a similar manner.

Her advice to female entrepreneurs is, “Don’t let anyone tell you what you cannot do.”

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